Some Arawaks migrated from British Guiana (modern-day Guyana) in the 19th century and continue to live in Barbados.

In 1854, a cholera epidemic killed over 20,000 inhabitants.

At emancipation in 1833, the size of the slave population was approximately 83,000.

During the Cromwellian era (1650s) this included a large number of prisoners-of-war, vagrants and people who were illicitly kidnapped, who were forcibly transported to the island and sold as servants.

These last two groups were predominately Irish, as several thousand were infamously rounded up by English merchants and sold into servitude in Barbados and other Caribbean islands during this period.

Forty percent of the tourists come from the UK, with the US and Canada making up the next large groups of visitors to the island.

In 2016, Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index ranked Barbados sixth in the Americas after Canada, the United States, Uruguay, Chile and the Bahamas.

That source suggested the followers of Byam became known as 'Bims' and that this became a word for all Barbadians.

The Arawaks from South America became dominant around 800 AD, and maintained that status until around 1200.

An English ship, the Olive Blossom, arrived in Barbados in 1625; its men took possession of it in the name of King James I.