“I think it's good for surfer bros and models, but I don't think many people are actually dating or hooking up on Raya.

dating a house-30

It’s not like Linked In, where everyone understands that you're there for work, and you can apply for a job.

Instead, Raya creates the promise of something romantic, but it’s actually just people trying to be around other cooler people.” He shrugged.

“But their popularity is ensured by their complete acceptance of their popularity.

Raya is an app that’s supposed to reproduce that sense of cliquishness—it’s like, for whatever reason, are approved as members of a club.”Like in high school, the thing about cliques is, they breed conformity.

It’s the Soho House world of elitism: They want to draw young, cool artists, but they actually just attract rich people, and dudes in advertising who collect vintage cameras as decorations.” As for the girls on Raya? “It’s an endless stream of photos of girls doing splits on the beach, or a photo from the one time they modeled for, like, Rawanastan or something.”Alan’s main pet peeve about Raya is that, the few times he met girls through the app, what he’d thought was genuine flirtation turned out to be a networking ploy—they were just actresses who wanted work.

“Raya’s not a dating app, it's a social-climbing app,” Alan told me.

Unfortunately, literally looks fuckable in a slideshow.

Especially when it’s a slideshow of like five shirtless pics (one with a BFA watermark on it) to the soundtrack of Eminem’s “Lose Yourself,” something I endured during the research process of this article.

Raya says it values creative achievements, but they’re not interested in and stay in on Saturday nights to read Walter Benjamin instead of going to Paul’s Baby Grand. Recently, the app rejected a friend of mine—an Iranian-American Doctor of Philosophy. Because Raya is like being back in high school, where the hierarchy of popularity is superficial and undeserved.