Intel also manufactures motherboard chipsets, network interface controllers and integrated circuits, flash memory, graphics chips, embedded processors and other devices related to communications and computing.

Intel Corporation was founded on July 18, 1968, by semiconductor pioneers Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore (of Moore's law fame), and widely associated with the executive leadership and vision of Andrew Grove.

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At its founding, Intel was distinguished by its ability to make semiconductors.

Its first product, in 1969, was the 3101 Schottky TTL bipolar 64-bit static random-access memory (SRAM), which was nearly twice as fast as earlier Schottky diode implementations by Fairchild and the Electrotechnical Laboratory in Tsukuba, Japan.

It is the world's second largest and second highest valued semiconductor chip makers based on revenue after being overtaken by Samsung, and is the inventor of the x86 series of microprocessors, the processors found in most personal computers (PCs).

Intel supplies processors for computer system manufacturers such as Apple, Lenovo, HP, and Dell.

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Central processing units Microprocessors Integrated graphics processing units (i GPU) So Cs Motherboard chipsets Network interface controllers Modems Mobile phones Solid state drives Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Chipsets Flash memory Vehicle automation sensors Intel Corporation (also known as Intel, stylized as intel) is an American multinational corporation and technology company headquartered in Santa Clara, California, in the Silicon Valley.

The only major competitor in the x86 processor market is Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), with which Intel has had full cross-licensing agreements since 1976: each partner can use the other's patented technological innovations without charge after a certain time.

Some smaller competitors such as VIA Technologies produce low-power x86 processors for small factor computers and portable equipment.

The Open Source Technology Center at Intel hosts Power TOP and Latency TOP, and supports other open-source projects such as Wayland, Intel Array Building Blocks, and Threading Building Blocks (TBB), and Xen.