After that the Roman split the region into three administrative divisions.

A part of this population later moved to Mycenae around 1600 BC and founded the Mycenaean civilisation there.

In ancient times, the territory of modern Albania was mainly inhabited by a number of Illyrian tribes.

Several Bronze Age artefacts from tumulus burials have been unearthed in central and southern Albania that show close connection with sites in south-western Macedonia and Lefkada, Greece.

Archaeologists have come to the conclusion that these regions were inhabited from the middle of the third millennium BC by Indo-European people who spoke a Proto-Greek language.

Its coast touches the Adriatic Sea to the west and the Ionian Sea to the southwest, forming the Albanian Riviera.

Albania is less than 72 km (45 mi) from Italy across the Strait of Otranto, which connects the Adriatic to the Ionian.

In the mid-fifteenth century, it was conquered by the Ottomans.

The modern nation state of Albania emerged in 1912 following the defeat of the Ottomans in the Balkan Wars.

Following the death of Dhimiter, the last member of the Progon family, the principality came under the Albanian-Greek Gregory Kamonas and later Golem of Kruja.

Arbanon is considered to be the first sketch of an Albanian state, that retained a semi-autonomous status as the western extremity of an empire, under the Byzantine Doukai of Epirus or Laskarids of Nicaea.

After the defeat of Nazi Germany, a Communist state titled the People's Socialist Republic of Albania was founded under the leadership of Enver Hoxha and the Party of Labour.