Hefner liked the name, as he thought it reflected high living and sophistication.

Hefner produced the first edition of out of his South Side home.

He studied at the Chicago Art Institute for a summer before enrolling at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he majored in psychology.

It hit newsstands in December 1953, but did not carry a date because Hefner was unsure as to whether or not a second issue would be produced.

To help ensure its success, Hefner had purchased a color photograph of actress Marilyn Monroe in the nude—which had been taken some years earlier—and placed it in the centerfold of the magazine.

Yet he also earned a reputation for being controlling and trying to enforce double standards.: the urbane sophisticate in the silk smoking jacket with pipe in hand.

He adopted a wide range of pursuits and socialized with the famous and wealthy, always in the company of young, beautiful women.

He later did a semester of graduate school work in the area of sociology, focusing on the sex research institute established by Alfred Kinsey.

By the early 1950s, Hefner had landed a copy-writing job at the Chicago office of magazine, which featured literary works by such writers as Ernest Hemingway and F.

Hefner chose the rabbit for its "humorous sexual connotation" and because the image was "frisky and playful"—an image he fostered in the magazine's articles and cartoons.

Hefner wanted to distinguish his magazine from most other men's periodicals, which catered to outdoorsmen and showcased he-man fiction.

“My concern with the clubs was, since we were dealing with dreams and fantasies, how could you recreate that in a club atmosphere?