I am trying to transfer some video files from an external hard drive (extracted from a 2010 Macbook pro) onto a 2012 i Mac.I can transfer smaller files, such as PDFS, with success, but whenever I try to transfer a .

updating boot support partitions for the volume-26

This example uses 2.2 GB cache in RAM: For a full 1TB Time Machine backup disk with many millions of files, this completes in about 10 minutes.

A nice side effect is that this also puts less stress on the disk, as most reads are served from the cache.

There are many step-by-step guides on the internet that explain how to add an SSD to an existing Mac, and create a 'Fusion Drive' that has the speed of an SSD, but also the capacity of a Hard Drive.

All these guides fall short in one way that was important to me.

I got a new SSD and so I booted from a tertiary drive to clone my old SSD onto my new SSD. Just in case anyone out there runs into the same problem, they can find the solution here.

After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/

After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.When you plug in the flash drive it will appear in the first line of the program.For a laptop computer that might be far from home, not having a Recovery Partition was unacceptable to me.

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After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.

To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.

When you plug in the flash drive it will appear in the first line of the program.

For a laptop computer that might be far from home, not having a Recovery Partition was unacceptable to me.

||

After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.

To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.

echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/

After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.When you plug in the flash drive it will appear in the first line of the program.For a laptop computer that might be far from home, not having a Recovery Partition was unacceptable to me.

||

After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.

To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.

When you plug in the flash drive it will appear in the first line of the program.

For a laptop computer that might be far from home, not having a Recovery Partition was unacceptable to me.

||

After the clone I ran Repair Disk and noticed at the end of the repair it "trimmed" my SSD. I couldn't find anything on the Internet that referred to this issue.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.

To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.

/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

" exit 1 fi echo "Performing filesystem check on $DISK" diskutil unmount Disk $DISK sudo fsck_hfs -f -c 2200m $DISK diskutil mount Disk $DISK With the arrival of Lion, you might be stuck with a recovery USB drive that came with your Snow Leopard pre-installed Macbook Air.

To do this, download sm32xtest (no need to look, Google has already found it) and open in Windows, for example through Boot Camp or on another PC.

When you plug in the flash drive it will appear in the first line of the program.

For a laptop computer that might be far from home, not having a Recovery Partition was unacceptable to me.