Business-to-business and financial services on the Internet affect supply chains across entire industries.

The terms Internet and World Wide Web are often used interchangeably in everyday speech; it is common to speak of "going on the Internet" when using a web browser to view web pages.

However, the World Wide Web or the Web is only one of a large number of Internet services.

Notable exceptions were the Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) in June 1973, followed in 1973 by Sweden with satellite links to the Tanum Earth Station and Peter T.

Kirstein's research group in the United Kingdom, initially at the Institute of Computer Science, University of London and later at University College London.

Only the overreaching definitions of the two principal name spaces in the Internet, the Internet Protocol address (IP address) space and the Domain Name System (DNS), are directed by a maintainer organization, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

The technical underpinning and standardization of the core protocols is an activity of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), a non-profit organization of loosely affiliated international participants that anyone may associate with by contributing technical expertise.

Early international collaborations on the ARPANET were rare.

European developers were concerned with developing the X.25 networks.

In an early sign of future growth, fifteen sites were connected to the young ARPANET by the end of 1971.

These early years were documented in the 1972 film Computer Networks: The Heralds of Resource Sharing.

Most traditional communications media, including telephony, radio, television, paper mail and newspapers are being reshaped, redefined, or even bypassed by the Internet, giving birth to new services such as email, Internet telephony, Internet television, online music, digital newspapers, and video streaming websites.