I cannot be the only one who thinks that a 20 year-old judging the attractiveness of a 50 year-old online dater is going to necessarily give a lower attractiveness score than might a judge who is closer to the participant’s age.I raise this issue because the strongest results in the paper are the ones measuring photographic self-deception, where people have posted pictures of themselves in which they appear significantly more attractive than they do in everyday life.

They were objectively measured for weight and height and asked to provide proof of their age.

Finally they were photographed in three poses, one of which replicated their main profile picture.

They found that less attractive people were more likely to have chosen a profile picture in which they were significantly more attractive than they were in everyday life.

Women appeared to used this form of deception more than did men.

They might also be using an older picture simply because that is the one they put up when they started the process and have failed to update it as they have aged.

If this is the case, then the relationship between deception and attractiveness is not a result of people assessing themselves as being less attractive, it's just a function of time on the market.

Men make themselves a little taller (by about 1”) and women make themselves a little thinner (by about 8 pounds).

But unless you spent a summer working at a local fair guessing peoples' weight and height, the deceptions are so small, on average, that most people probably wouldn’t pick them out in a first date.

(I personally suspect, though, that this gender difference has less to do with male versus female deception and more to do with how much make-up a woman wears in the middle of the day to a lab experiment compared to when out for a date.)They also found that the less attractive a person was the more likely they were to have lied about objective measures of physical attractiveness such as height and weight.