When Telegraph Money spoke to one of Searchmate’s agents, we were told matchmakers would go to “great lengths” to find matches for singles, for example putting up posters in local sailing clubs (if the client listed sailing as a hobby), or even posting advertisements in newspapers. She said she sent several emails to Searchmate’s agents since November but did not hear back.In the meantime, she contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau, which provided some information on her consumer rights.

Because of this it had suspended her account, even though she had not asked for this to happen.

Searchmate has now offered Aileen a full refund of £1,295.

It can seem hard if it’s someone you know or it feels like making trouble for yourself.

Usually, though, people want to do the right thing and will be happy to fix any problems.

He claimed to be a high flier in a major American toy firm, but then managed to convince her to give him £200 for medical treatment, encouraging her to take out credit cards.

“Getting sucked into this made me feel really stupid,” Aileen said.

It promises “affluent, educated men and women between the ages of 30 and 55, who are all looking for a long-term commitment.” It charges £180 a year for membership.

Another Telegraph Money reader, who does not wish to be named, turned to online dating after his relationship came to an end in February.

“My daughters said online dating wasn’t good for me anymore, so I started looking for alternatives.” Aileen then came across Searchmate, a bespoke dating service which featured on the first series of Channel 4's The Undateables.

It claims to offer a “safer and more credible alternative” to dating websites.

The site explained that this was down to most of the gentlemen who were active within her area “going on hold”, meaning they could no longer be contacted.