A corporation is a separate legal entity from its owners.

In other words, if a corporation, in the course of doing business, is involved in any legal action, then the corporation, for legal purposes, is its own person.

Mr Salomon owned 20,000 £1 shares, and his wife and five children owned one share each.

Some years later the company went into liquidation, and Mr Salomon claimed to be entitled to be paid first as a secured debenture holder.

In this case, a separate corporate entity was brought into existence outside the taxable territory with the ulterior motive of evading the tax obligation by the assessee mills.

The Supreme Court observed: "It is true that from the juristic point of view, the company is a legal personality entirely distinct from its members and the company is capable of enjoying rights and being subjected to duties which are not the same as those enjoyed or borne by its members.

The corporation is liable for its taxes - not the owner.

This is how corporations may sue and be sued, and their assets are tracked separately.

Separate personality means that the artificial legal person, the company, can do almost everything a human person can do; it can make contracts, employ people, borrow and pay money, sue and be sued, among other things.

The ‘veil of incorporation’ is the rather poetic term given to this separation of the company from its shareholders or members.

Once a company or corporation is formed, the business which is carried on by the such company or corporation is the business of that company or corporation and is not the business of the citizens who get the company or corporation incorporated and the rights of the incorporated body must be judges on that footing and cannot be judged on the assumption that they are the rights attributed to the business of individual citizens.