You'll gain the most value-added knowledge from your TKI assessment by deeply understanding the five modes, their two underlying dimensions (assertiveness and cooperativeness), and the three diagonal dimensions on the TKI Conflict Model.

During our 3-hour GROUP Training in Conflict Management, Dr.

More than 8,000,000 copies of the TKI have been published since 1974.

Besides its native English language, the TKI is also available in several other languges: Spanish (European and Latin American), French, Portuguese (Brazilian), Danish, Dutch, Swedish, Japanese, Russian, German, Italian, and Chinese (traditional and simplified).

The TKI is designed to measure a person's behavior in conflict situations.

"Conflict situations" are those in which the concerns of two people appear to be incompatible.

When we say “Conflict”, the first word comes to our mind is Fight, Avoid, Anger, Lose, Pain, Control, War, Hate, Impasse, Loss, Destruction, Bad, Fear, Wrong doing, Mistake etc., As you can see, conflicts is almost universally perceived as a negative occurrence. Often, a conflict presents opportunities for improvement.

As I shared in my last blog post that a conflict is a situation when the interests, needs, goals or values of involved parties interfere with one another. Therefore, it is important to understand (and apply) various conflict resolution techniques.

In such situations, we can describe an individual's behavior along two dimensions: (1) assertiveness, the extent to which the person attempts to satisfy his own concerns, and (2) cooperativeness, the extent to which the person attempts to satisfy the other person's concerns.

These two basic dimensions of behavior define five different modes for responding to conflict situations: Each of us is capable of using all five conflict-handling modes.

It might be that they have similar or very different styles.

Without awareness of one’s own style, and idea of what style a negotiation counterpart brings and the advantages and disadvantages of working with differing styles, it may make for a bumpier road to successful outcomes.

Kilmann will explain how to develop Group TKI Profiles, which are based on each member's response to two TKIs, each with modified instructions, regarding their conflict-handling behavior: (1) INSIDE their group and (2) OUTSIDE their group (in all other settings in their life). Kilmann then interprets a number of very different Group TKI Profiles, which brings them to life.