I’d like to give my successor some advice that might help them “manage” Fergus — such as “if you want concrete deadlines, you need to ask for them clearly, vocally, and often” and “as the youngest person in this office, your informal job duties will also include computer support.”I realize that my perspective is a little biased, and I don’t want to sound like a disgruntled former employee because overall this workplace has given me many opportunities and Fergus is a genuinely good (but, to me, infuriating) person.

What kind of advice is appropriate in this situation?

I got a disgusting and unprompted message from someone on Tinder.

Unfortunately for him, he left his employer on his profile.

Part of me feels like one of my duties is to demonstrate the importance of respecting another person’s schedule, and of maintaining a professional agreement (i.e., the meeting time).

So when I get an early arrival, I typically stay at my desk (which is out of sight of Reception) and come out only 5-10 minutes before the scheduled time.

I tried to talk about all the duties I enjoyed, but I think my old boss was so hung up on convincing me that it went in one ear and out the other.

But I have a good relationship with her and want to maintain that relationship, as she would be a great resource for me professionally.I don’t mind the 5- to 10-minute early bird, but some arrive as far as 45 minutes in advance.Some background: my company works to prepare people for entry or re-entry into the workforce, sometimes by addressing matters of professionalism (attire, conduct, etc.).I try to confirm the time with them first, make sure it’s on my calendar, and plan accordingly.Then my day gets thrown off when I get a call from Reception way before the client’s expected to show up.This strategy, while doable, makes me feel like an entitled jerk for making clients wait so long, since I tend to have a lot of downtime and there’s usually no reason I can’t meet with a client the moment they decide to show up.